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Colloidal Copper

Colloidal Copper

Naclo Health Products

  • $19.00


"Fountain Of Youth" Mineral

Copper is an essential nutrient needed for red blood cells, protein metabolism, enzymes, hair & skin colour, and healthy nerves. Copper has traditionally been used for arthritis, grey hair, sagging skin and wrinkles, burns and as a general health tonic.

Naclo Health Product’s Colloidal Copper is custom electrically manufactured using no chemicals and only 99.99% ultrapure source metal. Our copper analysis report from Southern Cross University's Environmental Lab tested as:

(milligram per litre)

Total Copper - 1.994mg/l, Dissolved Copper - 0.635mg/l, Colloidal Copper - 1.994mg/l

Copper is an essential trace element. Human organs with the highest concentrations are kidney and liver, followed by brain, heart and bone in that order. These organs contain more than half the copper in the body. More than a dozen enzymes depending on copper for their activity have been identified; the metabolic conversions catalyzed by all of these are oxidative.

A couple of dozen other enzymes are also affected by copper deficiency.Dietary recommendations: adults 1.5 - 3.0 mg/day, infants .4 - .6 mg/day

What is the use and function of COPPER?:

Necessary for the absorption & utilization of Iron; helps oxidize Vitamin C and works with Vitamin C to form Elastin, a chief component of the Elastin muscle fibers throughout the body; aids in the formation of red blood cells; helps proper bone formation & maintenance.

Copper is an essential trace element. Human organs with the highest concentrations are kidney and liver, followed by brain, heart and bone in decreasing order. These organs contain more than half the copper in the body. More than a dozen enzymes depending on copper for their activity have been identified; the metabolic conversions catalyzed by all of these are oxidative. A couple of dozen other enzymes are affected by copper deficiency with some being more, and others, less active.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:

May result in general weakness, impaired respiration, skin sores.

In animals the main organ systems affected by copper deficiency are bone, brain and nervous system, and heart and blood vessels. The first adverse effect of insufficient copper discovered nearly 70 years ago was anemia from impaired utilization of iron. Infertility and spontaneous abortion also have been found. In more than 30 men and women successfully depleted by copper under controlled conditions abnormalities of the electrocardiogram, blood pressure regulation, glucose tolerance, and lipid metabolism (increased cholesterol in blood plasma) have been reported. Measurement of copper in blood plasma is not very useful in assessing nutritional status because of its sensitivity to hormonal and inflammatory influences.

Diet recommendations: The Estimated Safe and Adequate Dietary Intake range of copper for adults of all ages and both sexes is L5 to 3.0 mg/day. For infants the range is 0.4 to 0.6 mg/day; this is substantially more on a body weight basis than that for adults. Usual intakes in the U.S. average 1.2 and 0.9 mg daily for men and women, respectively, with about 30% of daily diets being below 1mg. Intakes below 1mg have produced potentially adverse changes in physiology

Food sources: From among 235 foods arranged in order of increasing copper, fats and oils, skim milk, yogurt, mayonnaise, jelly and jam, sugar, corn, tuna and lettuce are representative of the lowest one fourth of foods. Legumes, some ready-to-eat cereals, mushrooms, chocolate, seeds and nuts, crab, peanut butter, liver and oysters are representative of the highest. Copper intake can be improved by following the Food Pyramid. Copper absorption is relatively unaffected in comparison to iron or zinc by food type with absorption generally being in the 40 to 60% range.

Toxicity: Copper is comparatively non-toxic when compared to other trace elements, with the possible exception in some forms of childhood cirrhosis. Usual daily diets in the U.S. rarely contain more than 5 mg; an occasional intake of 10mg probably is safe for adults. In contrast, dietary supplements of zinc approximating the Recommended Dietary Allowance (15 mg for adults) and higher doses produce potentially harmful abnormalities of lipid metabolism by inducing mild copper deficiency. Recent research: Anemia has been the focus of copper        research for more than 50 years. Now research on heart and blood vessel health and function is much more common, along with antioxidant functions, immune function and brain chemistry. The most important research question may be: to what extent do diets low in copper in comparison to suggested intakes have adverse effects on health?

 


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